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Lagersbergs Säteri 2014
Lagersbergs Säteri 2014 | Photo: Hangsna (CC BY-SA 4.0)
Mini-Map of Sweden with marker at Eskilstuna Kommun

Lagersbergs Säteri

Historical manor house in Eskilstuna

The 18th-century main house of the former noble estate Lagersbergs Säteri is one of the best-preserved manor houses in the Carolinian architectural style of the Swedish Great Power period. It is located on the southern outskirts of Eskilstuna, the centre of the municipality of Eskilstuna Kommun.

Bronze Age finds near today's manor house and a nearby Iron Age burial ground testify that the history of Lagersberg Säteri goes back to pre-Christian times. The first documented mention of the property, then still under the name Hunsta, is found in a bill of sale by the knight Lars Magnusson from 1356. In the 15th century, the property was donated to the local St. John's monastery and in the 16th century, after the Reformation, it was confiscated by the Crown.

The history of the Lagersberg Säteri

In the 1660s, the nobleman Erik Dryselius Lagerqvist received the right of ownership for the estate. In 1668, the estate was granted the privileges of a knight's estate, which on the one hand meant tax exemption, but at the same time also brought with it the obligation to build on the estate in accordance with its status. Lagerqvist had the present manor house and the two wing buildings built in the so-called Carolinian style, a distinct Swedish style of the Great Power period. This architectural style is most recognisable by its typical roof form - a hipped roof interrupted by a low mezzanine floor, known in Sweden as a Säteritak (manor house roof) or Carolinian roof.

By marriage, the estate came into the possession of the noble family Siegroth at the beginning of the 18th century, a family which already owned several estates in Sörmland. The estate was renamed from Hunsta to Lagersberg during that time and acquired its present appearance in the middle of the century. The wall and ceiling paintings preserved in the manor house, for example, date back to the era of the Siegroth family.

In the early 19th century, Lagersbergs Säteri became the property of the industrialist Birger Fredrik Rothoff, before the Persson family took over the farm in the 1870s as the last private owners. Sven Persson was an agronomist and mainly developed agricultural production at Lagersberg. At the same time, he had a great interest in the cultural-historical significance of the estate, which is shared in the same way by his descendants.

In 1991, the Persson family transferred Lagersbergs Säteri to the Lagersberg Foundation, which they established to preserve the culturally and historically significant estate for posterity. All activities related to Lagersbergs Säteri, such as tours, exhibitions and various cultural events, are carried out on behalf of the foundation by the Eskilstuna Stadsmuseum.

Visit Lagersbergs Säteri

During the summer months from June to August, you can visit the well-preserved manor house with its early 19th century furnishings and 18th century wall and ceiling paintings on free guided tours. You can also take a look at the sparsely furnished dwellings of the former farm workers as well as other historical buildings such as the smithy, barn, stables or the former ice cellar. The open-air grounds of the estate with garden and park can also be visited outside regular opening hours.

In the northern wing building there is a cosy café with a simple range of biscuits and drinks as well as seating both indoors and outdoors. Furthermore, there is a museum shop with an assortment of various gift items, handicrafts from the region, toys, handmade jewellery or literature on local history.

The buildings are not barrier-free. The manor house is only accessible via stairs, there are no ramps and there are high door thresholds inside the buildings. Dogs are allowed on a leash outside, but are prohibited inside the buildings.

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